Tag: weight loss

ZINN: ‘UNETHICAL FOR DIETITIANS NOT TO OFFER LCHF’

Dr Caryn Zinn and advocate Dr Ravin 'Rocky' Ramdass

Dr Caryn Zinn and advocate Dr Ravin ‘Rocky’ Ramdass

By Marika Sboros

Three things embarrass New Zealand-based dietitian and academic Dr Caryn Zinn most these days. At university, she never questioned what lecturers said about diet. In her private practice, she prescribed low-fat diets to adults and children for 15 years.  As a university lecturer, she told students low-carb diets were dangerous.

Zinn said this in her evidence led by Advocate Dr Ravin “Rocky” Ramdass, for University of Cape Town emeritus professor Tim Noakes, at the fourth session of Health Professions Council Of SA (HPCSA) hearing against him on October 26.

In Part 1 of a two-part series on her evidence in chief, she explains why she believes that it’s unethical for dieitians who know about  LCHF (low-carb, high-fat) not to offer it as an option to patients.



NOAKES TRIAL: MAKING A ‘REAL MEAL’ OF CRITICS

Prof Tim Noakes

Prof Tim Noakes

University of Cape Town emeritus professor Tim Noakes  generates abnormally high levels of venom from doctors and dietitians for a spectacular about-turn in favour of low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) in 2010.  Noakes is facing a charge of ‘unprofessional conduct’ for tweeting his opinion to a breastfeeding mother that the best weaning foods for infants are LCHF – in other words, meat and veg.

Here, in the first of an updated two-part Q&A session with me, Noakes makes a tasty ‘real meal’ of critics – and the trial against him. He refers to his new research to be published soon that will challenge conventional ‘wisdom’ once again.  

By Marika Sboros

Attacks aimed at Prof Tim Noakes are limited only by the imagination. They are as personal as they are professional in nature:  



Think you can outrun a bad diet? Fat chance!

MAN RUN EXERCISEDoctors and dietitians wedded to old nutrition paradigms want you to believe that obesity is the result of gluttony and sloth; that all you have to do to shed adipose tissue (the medical profession’s euphemism for excess body fat)  is to eat less and move more. Canadian nephrologist Dr Jason Fung says that’s a recipe for starvation. Fung joins growing numbers of doctors and scientists who don’t have links to vested interests in food and drug industries and who say the science is there to show that you really can’t outrun a bad diet. They aren’t saying exercise isn’t important. It is – for stamina, toning and cardiac fitness. It just isn’t an effective weight loss tool. Here’s what three world authorities say on the topic:  

By Marika Sboros

It no real surprise that a message about exercise and weightloss in an editorial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (BJSM) in 2015 by three of the world’s top experts in low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) got lost in translation …



Cracking the obesity code: Jason Fung’s weight loss secret

Photo credit: qu1j0t3 via Foter.com / CC BY-NC

By Marika Sboros

Dr Jason Fung can make you fat – or he can make you thin.

Fung, a Canadian physician and nephrologist (kidney specialist), is the closest modern medicine comes to a magician. Along with fellow Canadian physician Dr Jay Wortman (you’ll be reading lots about both on foodmed.net), Fung is transforming weight loss and



Tim Noakes: Idiot’s Guide to LCHF and Banting

Picture: THE NOAKES FOUNDATION

Picture: THE NOAKES FOUNDATION

By Marika Sboros

Some doctors and dietitians will still tell you a low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diet is dangerous. That’s despite compelling evidence to show safety and efficacy of LCHF for weight loss, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and even dementia.

LCHF is a global phenomenon. In South Africa, there are more than three million “Banters”, as fans of LCHF regimens are known in that country. Banting pioneer is University of Cape Town emeritus professor Tim Noakes, a world-renowned scientist and medical doctor. Here, in a Q&A, Noakes gives the basics and an Idiot’s Guide to getting started on the LCHF path.



You need 5-a-day fruit and veg? No you don’t! – Zoë Harcombe

fruit.veg

5-A-DAY fruit and veg servings – it’s a mantra doctors and dietitians repeat to patients as if it’s written in stone somewhere. They even say you can drink most of those servings, and that fruit and veg juices are instant boosts for your health. Yet 5-a-day has no science behind it whatsoever, says British obesity researcher Dr Zoë Harcombe. It’s a number plucked out of thin air, a memorable number, she says, the same  as the digits on one hand. (Presumably, those who came up with it think that makes it easier for people to count servings?) The campaign is a different number-a-day across more than 25 countries, she says. Some say three, others four, five or more.  Harcombe’s not saying you shouldn’t eat fruit and veg. Just don’t believe the magical health benefits doctors and dietitians promise you because there isn’t any science to show there will be. During my last visit to London, the British government told its citizens that fruit juice should no longer be part of 5-a-day servings – because of the high sugar content. Harcombe says’s she’ll only drink a toast to that advice when …



CAN’T LOSE WEIGHT? HARCOMBE BUSTS DIET MYTHS

obesityMany dietitians say that all you have to do to lose weight is eat less and exercise more. They also say you must avoid saturated fat like the plague because it clogs arteries and causes heart disease. And they say that meat is bad, carbs are good and you should eat at least five-a-day fruit and veg.

Those are some of the diet myths that make you fatter and sicker, says UK public health researcher Dr Zoë Harcombe. 

Those myths make dietitians increasingly irrelevant. They also contribute to the obesity, diabetes and heart disease epidemics across the globe, says Harcombe. She demolishes myths in her brilliant e-book, 20 Diet Myths – Busted. Scroll to end for details on where to get it. Here, she gives 12 of those myths in bite-size pieces – Marika Sboros



Can you trust dietitians who are in bed with Big Food?

Weight Loss Signpost Showing Fiber Exercise Fruit And CaloriesShould you follow advice from dietitians who are bed partners with the food industry? Even when they say it’s just for the sponsorship money, and food companies have no influence on their advice whatsoever? 

The spotlight falls often on the Association for Dietetics in South Africa (ADSA), but it’s  a global concern. Food companies exert influence subtly through orthodox-trained dietitians who act as proxies whether by default or design. British investigative health journalist Jerome Burne has written a scathing blog on it: Cuddly dietitians in cosy embrace of industry fat cats.

In the first of a two-part series, Eategrity consumer activist  Sonia Mountford looks at ADSA’s links with Big Food and what effect this may be having on the advice it gives. But do you really need independent dietary advice? As an ancient Ayurvedic sage once said: When diet is wrong, medicine is of no use; when diet is right, medicine is of no need. – Marika Sboros

By Sonia Mountford*

Like many consumers, you are likely to be more aware these days than you were in the past, of what certain foods or food components may be doing to promote your health, and reduce your



Tim Noakes on ‘Banting’: where it began, where it’s headed

Prof Tim Noakes. Picture: courtesy of the NOAKES FOUNDATION

Prof Tim Noakes. Picture: courtesy of the NOAKES FOUNDATION

It has been billed as a world-first, a unique health summit at the Cape Town International Conference Centre from February 20 to 22, 2015, that could change the world – nutritionally speaking. It brings together under one roof the world’s top  doctors, nutrition scientists, researchers and writers on the efficacy and safety of low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) to treat and prevent serious disease. Speakers will look at the science, the raging  controversy, and what works and doesn’t work in diets for weight loss, health and healing. In other words, how food really can be best medicine or slowest form of poison.

The summit’s host is Prof Tim Noakes, a South African medical doctor, internationally renowned scientist and University of Cape Town emeritus professor. He has generated as much interest and support as venomous attack for changing his mind on the role of carbohydrates in the diet four years ago, in favour of LCHF.  Here, in his own words, Noakes gives the history behind the global LCHF movement, the background to his own journey and what he hopes the Summit will achieve: ‘a statement that will be heard around the world’. – Marika Sboros