Tag: Stephen Phinney

Virta Health visionary behind diabetes ‘cure’ of the future

Sami Inkinen

By Marika Sboros

For diabetes treatment of the future, look no further than Virta Health. The US start-up is an online specialty medical clinic with a brilliant app for type 2 diabetics. It is on track to achieve a holy grail: a diabetes ‘cure’ without drugs or surgery.

It’s  the closest that modern medicine comes to a ‘cure’ for the global epidemic.

Virta Health‘s ‘cure’ is safe, sustainable, cheap and accessible. Virta is about to publish research on its method that looks set to be a game-changer. It’s the largest and longest trial using the ketogenic (very low-carb, high-fat) diet to treat type 2 diabetes.

The visionary founder behind Virta is its 41-year-old Finnish-born CEO, Sami Inkinen. He’s a data-driven technology entrepreneur and multi-millionaire philanthropist. His co-founders are the ‘fathers’ of ketogenic diets: Prof Stephen Phinney and Prof Jeff Volek. I call them the ‘kings of ketosis’.

Yet ketogenic diets are still controversial, despite significant and growing anecdotal evidence. Many doctors and dietitians still believe that ketogenic diets will be killers rather than saviours of diabetics.



Think you can outrun a bad diet? Fat chance!

MAN RUN EXERCISEDoctors and dietitians wedded to old nutrition paradigms want you to believe that obesity is the result of gluttony and sloth; that all you have to do to shed adipose tissue (the medical profession’s euphemism for excess body fat)  is to eat less and move more. Canadian nephrologist Dr Jason Fung says that’s a recipe for starvation. Fung joins growing numbers of doctors and scientists who don’t have links to vested interests in food and drug industries and who say the science is there to show that you really can’t outrun a bad diet. They aren’t saying exercise isn’t important. It is – for stamina, toning and cardiac fitness. It just isn’t an effective weight loss tool. Here’s what three world authorities say on the topic:  

By Marika Sboros

It no real surprise that a message about exercise and weightloss in an editorial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (BJSM) in 2015 by three of the world’s top experts in low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) got lost in translation …