Cancer is big business globally. Cynics  – or realists, depending on your viewpoint – say it’s an industry ‘too prosperous to allow for a cure’. In 2015, the global market for annual sales of cancer drugs hit $100 billion. Estimates then were that it could reach $147 billion by 2018. It’s probably much more by now.

Yet despite the decades-long ‘war on cancer’ and billions spent on research, a cure is elusive. Of course, there has been progress. However, conventional treatment methods of chemotherapy and radiation have serious limitations, both in safety and efficacy. Even orthodox oncologists these days privately admit that these methods can be life-taking as much as life-saving.

Canadian nephrologist Dr Jason Fung has a special interest in cancer. Many of his patients have diabetes, a condition that significantly increases the risk of cancer. He says that there’s good reason why doctors lost the war. They cut the limbs of the facts to fit a popular – but wrong – theory. And still do. He says it’s time to stop lopping off limbs of inconvenient truths about the dread disease Fung turns to a myth of ancient Greece to explain why. – Marika Sboros