Tag: high-fat

Sugar addiction: how to beat ‘elephant in the kitchen’

By Marika Sboros

elephantIs there really such a thing as sugar addiction? What about carb addiction? Some scientists say it’s hype and marketing. Others say it’s real.

US paediatrics professor Dr Robert Lustig is a specialist in childhood obesity and neuroendocrinology and childhood obesity. He calls sugar addiction “the elephant in the kitchen”.

UK consultant cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra says sugar is “the single most important dietary factor contributing to a worldwide epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes”. Malhotra has written a foreword to the  revised UK edition of the best-selling Sugar Free – 8 Weeks to Freedom from Sugar and Carb Addiction (Robinson). The author is recovered sugar addict Karen Thomson. It’s a riveting read. If you still harbour any doubt that sugar addiction is real, this book dispels it: 



Low Carb USA 2016: rumble in the nutrition science jungle!

By Marika Sboros

food pyramidThe US government’s dietary guidelines have made people fatter and sicker over the past 40 years and need a complete overhaul, say scientists. They say the guidelines are unscientific and their effects catastropic for public health: epidemics of diet-related illnesses including obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. They say the guidelines have contribute to unnecessary suffering and deaths, while contributing to skyrocketing healthcare costs.

Next month, 25 of the world’s top medical and scientific minds will gather at the Low Carb San Diego 2016 conference, the largest of its kind to date, to be held  from July 29 – 31 to examine what can be done to turn that situation around:



Britain’s ‘fat wars’: PHC warriors take up low-carb arms

By Marika Sboros

stormtrooperBritain’s “fat wars” are spreading, as sporadic skirmishes break out between the newly created independent Public Health Collaboration (PHC) and the establishment Public Health England (PHE).

The latest salvo was the PHC’s inaugural annual conference in Birmingham on June 11. The stellar panel of speakers drew heavy armoury of scientific research to challenge conventional public health advice and call for a complete overhaul of the UK’s official dietary guidelines. 

A leitmotif running through the conference came through a study by one of the conference speakers, top British obesity researcher Dr Zoe Harcombe, published in the BMJ Open Heart in 2015. It showed that the US guidelines on which the UK’s guidelines are based, were without scientific foundation when first introduced in the late 1970s, and remain so today. Results have been catastrophic: 



Hearty new evidence: even ‘bad’ cholesterol good for you!

By Marika Sboros

heart disease

Far from harming hearts, cholesterol protects tickers!

For decades, you’ve been fed big fat lies about saturated fat: that it will kill you, and you should lower your cholesterol to prevent premature death from heart attack or stroke. That’s if you believe Scottish GP Dr Malcolm Kendrick in the  video interview below, on his new research in the BMJ (British Medical Journal); and the growing numbers of  doctors and heart specialists worldwide who are on the same page as Kendrick.

If you believe Prof Jeremy Pearson, associate medical director of the British Heart Foundation, and the many others who think just like him, you’ll  swallow the research they regularly trot out about low-fat diets to support their position:



All seed oils safe to eat? Fat chance!

By Marika Sboros

Seeds are sometimes called vegetable oils, though not strictly correctly

Seed oils are sometimes called vegetable oils, though not strictly correctly

Globally, scientists say growing and compelling evidence reveals significant health risks associated with use of seed oils such as canola and sunflower – unless you live in South Africa. Scientists in that country say their research proves these oils are perfectly safe, will protect you from heart disease, and are free from “Frankenfood” genetic modifications to boot.

That ringing endorsement comes in a recent study published in the South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition (SAJCN). It’s enough to warm the cockles of the heart of the seed oil industry that makes billions from these products, even though concerns about serious health risks continue: 



UK ‘FAT WARS’: MARTIN LUTHER MOMENT FOR MEDICINE?

health

The moment in medicine when sick care becomes health care?

It began with a powerful public statement in May 2016 by leading British doctors, dietitians and scientists demanding that orthodoxy in medicine confronts its terminal weaknesses. In particular, they demand change in official guidelines that are heavily influenced by vested interests in food and drug companies. They say the guidelines are probably the ‘biggest error in the history of modern medicine’, with catastrophic effects on people’s health globally. The backlash was expected – and swift. The ‘rebels’ were denounced. There were resignations from the National Obesity Forum that issued the statement. The rebels remain undeterred. Award-winning British journalist Jerome Burne believes the fat wars herald a much-needed ‘Martin Luther moment’ for medicine. He explains why in a shortened version of his blog on the topic (for a full version, scroll down below). It’s a riveting read. – Marika Sboros

By Jerome Burne*

Last week the front page of The Times carried a story that was an opening shot in a revolution:



Low-carb for fatty liver? No-brainer! says cardiologist

LIVER BRAINIt’s a killer disease you can’t catch even as its tentacles spread across the globe. It is called NAFLD – non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. That distinguishes it from liver damage from bingeing on alcohol, but it is just as deadly. NAFLD affects hearts as well as livers. It affects children as well as adults, thin people as well as those who are overweight. Here, top Iceland cardiologist Dr Axel Sigurdsson gives the science to show why low-carb makes sense to treat NAFLD, and why it really should be a no-brainer. – Marika Sboros

By Axel Sigurdsson*

About 30% of people in the US have a disease characterised by abnormal deposits of fat in the liver. The disease is not contagious, and unlike many other disorders of the liver, it is not caused by overconsumption of alcohol. It is non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and has become the leading cause of chronic liver disease in many countries around the world.

It is normal to have fat in the liver. However, if the amount of fat is more than 5-10% of the weight of the liver, fatty liver disease is probably present. But why is having much fat in the liver a bad thing?



NOAKES ‘TRIAL OF THE 21ST CENTURY’: THE EVIDENCE Part 2

Noakes

By Marika Sboros

First  you become fat, then you develop insulin resistance, right? Probably not. South African scientist Prof Tim Noakes has been researching ketosis since the 1980s. In Part 2 of a series of videos of his evidence in chief at the Health Professions Council of SA (HPCSA) hearing against him in February, Noakes gives a Ketosis 101 lecture. He presents compelling research to show why he is innocent of the charge of unprofessional conduct.

But isn’t ketosis dangerous? You might well ask since many doctors and dietitian still believe it is. Here is another view:



Cancer therapy of the future? Already here, says Fettke!

Dr Gary Fettke

Australian surgeon Dr Gary Fettke makes a special study of nutrition for cancer

 The metabolic model of cancer has to be one of the most exciting areas of research these days. Australian orthopaedic surgeon Dr Gary Fettke is making it his life’s work to spread the news. What does an orthopaedic surgeon know about oncology? Lots, as it turns out.  Fettke is also a senior lecturer at the University of Tasmania, and does research into diet to treat diabetes, obesity and cancer. He is also a cancer survivor. Here’s a summary of a fascinating presentation Fettke gave to the low-carb summit in Cape Town in 2015. He titled it:  So you think you need sugar? Your cancer needs it even more! – Marika Sboros

By Gary Fettke

If you have cancer, here’s what you definitely want to avoid:  



Framingham: fatal flaws in low-fat science for hearts

heart CVDYou may idly wonder sometimes why doctors and dietitians still trot out advice to eat a low-fat diet to protect your heart when there wasn’t ever much science to back it up. More so in the wake of a growing body of science to show low-fat is not protective of most hearts after all. So just how did scientists manage to persuade doctors and the public otherwise – that low-fat was the way to go? They simply buried the evidence to show that it wasn’t, says US physician Dr Michael Eades. They did so not because they were bad, but likely because they just couldn’t face up to data that contradicted their passionately held beliefs. In other words, they were suffering from a nasty bout of cognitive dissonance, a relatively common phenomenon in scientific circles. In this blog below, Eades takes apart the “Framingham Study”, an egregious example of that cognitive dissonance in action. It remains as relevant today as when Eades wrote it some years ago. Reading it is enough to make hearts race at the implications for public health worldwide. – Marika Sboros

 By Michael Eades

Have you ever watched a movie that had a surprise ending, say, The Sixth Sense, for example, then watched it again? Once you know the ending, you see all kinds of things that make the ending obvious that you didn’t see the first time:



Real diabetes cure: diet or trimming your innards?

diabetesBy Marika Sboros

Doctors across the globe believe that bariatric surgery is a “breakthrough” treatment for type 2 diabetes. They claim that it’s the closest that modern medicine has come yet to a cure.

Bariatric surgery is an invasive procedure to reduce the size of the stomach or intestines or change the way the body absorbs food.

Doctors use it to treat morbid obesity that is sometimes a close companion of diabetes. For that reason, they often refer to the co-existing conditions of obesity and diabetes as “diabesity”.

So far, most obesity specialists have recommended bariatric surgery as last resort for people who can’t lose weight by conventional means. Now some say that even if diabetics are only mildly obese, bariatric surgery should be first option. 



Bring home the fat! Call by top UK doctors, dietitians

pig fat bacon

Saturated fat doesn’t cause heart disease, say the experts

By Marika Sboros 

It’s official and from Britain’s highest medical and dietetic levels: government-sanctioned dietary guidelines really are making you fat and sick.

The high-carb, low-fat, low-cholesterol message doctors and dietitians have given you for the past 40 years is proving to be the “biggest mistake in modern medical history”. It is one that has had “devastating consequences for public health” globally.

In a powerful public statement just released by UK National Obesity Forum (NOF) in association with the Public Health Collaboration (PHC), the country’s leading doctors, dietitians and scientists say: eating fat doesn’t make you fat; saturated fat doesn’t cause heart disease;  to avoid type 2 diabetes, you need to …



Will LCHF trigger a new heart disease epidemic?

Photo credit: digital-dreams via Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

Photo credit: digital-dreams via Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

Low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diets will give you a heart attack. Or rather, that’s what doctors who believe the so-called diet-heart hypothesis will tell you. That hypothesis is on the menu at Foodloose, a seminar on health and nutrition to be held in Reykjavik, Iceland on May 26. The hypothesis, for the lay person, is that fat in the diet equals fat in the arteries. It underpins the influential US dietary guidelines launched in the late 1970s and followed by most English-speaking countries thereafter. 

The results of those guidelines on population health worldwide have been nothing short of catastrophic – global epidemics of obesity, diabetes and heart disease. One of the speakers on the stellar panel of international experts at Foodloose is Icelandic cardiologist Dr Axel Sigurdsson. In a blog here, he poses the question whether the popularity of LCHF will trigger another heart attack epidemic. He explains why, based on the evidence available at the time, he thinks that outcome will be highly unlikely. Sigurdsson tells me he hasn’t seen any science so far to make him change his mind. – Marika Sboros



Why heart foundations are off beat on health!

heart healthHeart foundations globally keep beating to the tune of billions of dollars funding from product endorsement. I wouldn’t have such a problem with that were it not for heart foundations endorsing products that are anything but heart-healthy. The Heart Foundation of Australia even endorsed McDonalds products as healthy, for heaven’s sake. It very sensibly cut ties with the fast food chain in 2011. That was always likely to be a vain attempt to reclaim any vestige of credibility, given other unhealthy products it endorses. Another example is the Heart and Stroke Foundation of South Africa that still endorses margarine, although CEO Dr Vash Munghal-Singh tells me that’s under revision.

The  Heart Foundation of Australia recently retired it’s endorsement ‘tick’, following the Canadian lead. It can look like one step forwards – but also two steps backwards. The foundation favours a new star rating system that is highly flawed, says Australian physician Dr Joe Kosterich. And like its opposite numbers worldwide, the foundation is fat-phobic. It still promotes low-fat, fat-free foods and a high-carbohydrate intake.  It recently recommended people eat up to 14 servings of carbohydrate foods a day. That’s not just nuts; evidence suggests it can be a killer for both heart and diabetes patients. Here Kosterich looks at why heart foundations get it so wrong so often. – Marika Sboros

Dr Joe Kosterich

Here is something you are likely to have missed. The Heart Foundation of Australia, following Canada’s lead, is retiring its tick:



NOAKES TRIAL: MAKING A ‘REAL MEAL’ OF CRITICS

Prof Tim Noakes

Prof Tim Noakes

University of Cape Town emeritus professor Tim Noakes  generates abnormally high levels of venom from doctors and dietitians for a spectacular about-turn in favour of low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) in 2010.  Noakes is facing a charge of ‘unprofessional conduct’ for tweeting his opinion to a breastfeeding mother that the best weaning foods for infants are LCHF – in other words, meat and veg.

Here, in the first of an updated two-part Q&A session with me, Noakes makes a tasty ‘real meal’ of critics – and the trial against him. He refers to his new research to be published soon that will challenge conventional ‘wisdom’ once again.  

By Marika Sboros

Attacks aimed at Prof Tim Noakes are limited only by the imagination. They are as personal as they are professional in nature:  



Low-carb works for diabetes – why don’t more doctors advise it?

By Marika Sboros

Diabetes treatment is quietly undergoing transformation.

Diabetes treatment is quietly undergoing transformation.

Here’s food for thought: there is evidence to show that low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diets work very well for people with type 2 diabetes. Growing evidence shows that  LCHF diets can reverse the symptoms of diabetes completely. Many diabetics can also come off all medication altogether.

Yet many doctors, dietitians and government health services still won’t advise LCHF for diabetics. 

Why ever not, you might well ask?

The writer of an article on diabetes.co.uk asks that question and suggests answers.



Has the low-carb, Banting bubble finally burst?

Screen Shot 2016-05-09 at 3.21.04 PM

Are low-carb foods on their way out?

By Marika Sboros

The low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) bubble appears finally to have burst. A new study shows that doctors and  dietitians who say LCHF is a passing fad have been right all long. Carbs are fine even if you are obese as long as you keep fat low in your diet.

You might even believe that if you buy into findings of a study presented by US metabolism specialist Dr Kevin Hall at the International Obesity Congress held in Vancouver Canada earlier this month.

Hall has participated in studies in the past hinting at mortal wounding of the carb-insulin hypothesis of obesity including a study in the journal, Cell Metabolism, in 2015. Now he says his new research delivers the terminal blow.

Other doctors and scientists say: Not so fast. Hall is premature in declaring the death of the carb-insulin hypothesis. US physician Dr Michael Eades, a world authority on LCHF, goes further and says Hall may be “going rogue” and has “done something extremely bizarre” …



Ikaria – island diet secrets of people who ‘live forever’

Picutre: FACEBOOK

Idyllic Ikaria vista. Picture: FACEBOOK

WANT to live longer, healthier days on this earth? Drink Greek coffee every day on the island of Ikaria. Better still, drink a ‘bulletproof coffee’ daily, one with a dollop of butter and some MCT oil in it on Ikaria, the island whose people ‘forget to die’.  Ikarians are not fat-phobic. They’d consider low-fat yoghurt an oxymoron. And these days their diets fit into the spectrum of low-carb, high-fat lifestyles that are shown to promote longevity. Here’s how and why:

By Marika Sboros

Ikaria is a tiny little island nestling off the Greek mainland in the Aegean Sea close to Turkey. Just 48km long and less than 10km wide, Ikaria is known as “the ancient healing island”, “the island of old age”,  a “hotspot of exceptional human …



What’s really feeding fat phobia if it’s not science?

bacon eggsFAT phobia is still rampant. Cardiologists and dietitians still routinely tell patients that saturated fat increases the risk of heart attack. That’s despite growing and compelling science to the contrary that is documented in The Big Fat Surprise by Nina Teicholz. If you haven’t read it, go out and get it. Fat phobia is based on the belief (it’s just that – a belief, unsupported by science) that fat in the diet equals fat in the arteries. That conventional nutrition ‘wisdom’ is the result of the so-called ‘diet-heart hypothesis’ in the 1970s, the brainchild of  American scientist Dr Ancel Keys. Keys has a flock of loyal followers among doctors and dietitians who regularly dish up this belief without bothering to check if his own research backs it up. (It doesn’t. Teicholz explains why.) Here, a British sports scientist gets to the heart of why the diet-heart hypothesis doesn’t stand up to scientific scrutiny, and what’s REALLY behind fat phobia.  – Marika Sboros

By Craig Scott, University of Hull

THE CONVERSATION – Government nutrition guidelines recommend a high carbohydrate diet regardless of



Tim Noakes: Idiot’s Guide to LCHF and Banting

Picture: THE NOAKES FOUNDATION

Picture: THE NOAKES FOUNDATION

By Marika Sboros

Some doctors and dietitians will still tell you a low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diet is dangerous. That’s despite compelling evidence to show safety and efficacy of LCHF for weight loss, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and even dementia.

LCHF is a global phenomenon. In South Africa, there are more than three million “Banters”, as fans of LCHF regimens are known in that country. Banting pioneer is University of Cape Town emeritus professor Tim Noakes, a world-renowned scientist and medical doctor. Here, in a Q&A, Noakes gives the basics and an Idiot’s Guide to getting started on the LCHF path.