Tag: Aseem Malhotra

LCHF SLIPS INTO MEDICAL MAINSTREAM AT PHC GATHERING! PART 1

By Marika Sboros

If you harbour any doubt that low-carb, high-healthy-fat (LCHF) diets are becoming medical mainstream, the recent Public Health Collaboration (PHC) annual conference in London dispelled it.

Former Australian cricket team doctor Peter Brukner set the tone in his opening address on May 19. It is “almost negligent”, even close to “criminal”, he said, for doctors not to put patients on LCHF diets for diet-related illnesses. That was fighting talk and it resonated with speakers who expressed similar sentiments.But there was another strong sign that LCHF is becoming mainstream.



BIG FOOD, BIG PHARMA KILLING FOR PROFIT? YES, SAY TOP UK DOCTORS!

By Marika Sboros

 

Are Big Food and Big Pharma really killing people for profit globally? Yes, say some of the biggest names in European orthodox medicine. They’re joining forces on a panel discussion at the European Parliament in Brussels on April 12

The doctors say they will “blow the cover” on the dark world of Big Food and Big Pharma lobbying” to influence dietary and medical guidelines.

Click here to view the trailer

 

They promise a “unified show of force” that will expose collusion between politicians, respected medical institutions, “charities” and medical journals. They say that they will present new evidence of how food and drug industries have coerced doctors into prescribing unnecessary and potentially harmful treatments.

And they will show that major conflicts of interest at the highest levels have “hijacked evidence-based medicine”. The result, they say, has been an “epidemic of misinformation”.

Heading the panel is award-winning British cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra. With him are Dr Richard Thompson, personal physician to Britain’s Queen Elizabeth from 1984 to 2005 and past president of the Royal College of Physicians; endocrinologist Dr Carl Heneghan, Oxford University professor of evidence-based medicine; and Dutch diabetes professor at Leiden University Dr Hanno Pijl.



The Big Fat Fix: quick, get your hit here!

Big Fat FixBy Marika Sboros

How delicious and cool is this! British cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra’s new movie, The Big Fat Fix, premiered at Westminster to MPs on July 21. It is available to the public from today on the film’s website.

The Big Fat Fix is an independent co-production between Malhotra and former international athlete Donal O’Neill, producer of Cereal Killers (2013) and Run on Fat (2015).

It is a paean of praise to the Mediterranean diet – but only …



Britain’s ‘fat wars’: PHC warriors take up low-carb arms

By Marika Sboros

stormtrooperBritain’s “fat wars” are spreading, as sporadic skirmishes break out between the newly created independent Public Health Collaboration (PHC) and the establishment Public Health England (PHE).

The latest salvo was the PHC’s inaugural annual conference in Birmingham on June 11. The stellar panel of speakers drew heavy armoury of scientific research to challenge conventional public health advice and call for a complete overhaul of the UK’s official dietary guidelines. 

A leitmotif running through the conference came through a study by one of the conference speakers, top British obesity researcher Dr Zoe Harcombe, published in the BMJ Open Heart in 2015. It showed that the US guidelines on which the UK’s guidelines are based, were without scientific foundation when first introduced in the late 1970s, and remain so today. Results have been catastrophic: 



Think you can outrun a bad diet? Fat chance!

MAN RUN EXERCISEDoctors and dietitians wedded to old nutrition paradigms want you to believe that obesity is the result of gluttony and sloth; that all you have to do to shed adipose tissue (the medical profession’s euphemism for excess body fat)  is to eat less and move more. Canadian nephrologist Dr Jason Fung says that’s a recipe for starvation. Fung joins growing numbers of doctors and scientists who don’t have links to vested interests in food and drug industries and who say the science is there to show that you really can’t outrun a bad diet. They aren’t saying exercise isn’t important. It is – for stamina, toning and cardiac fitness. It just isn’t an effective weight loss tool. Here’s what three world authorities say on the topic:  

By Marika Sboros

It no real surprise that a message about exercise and weightloss in an editorial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (BJSM) in 2015 by three of the world’s top experts in low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) got lost in translation …



DEATH BY MEDICINE: DOCTORS WHO HARM MORE THAN HEAL

deadly medicine

I HAVE the greatest respect for the marvels of modern medicine and doctors who practise it as a calling. I’m not much of a fan of the ones who are in it for the money, who expect us to treat them as if they were omnipotent, omniscient creatures. Doctors are only human and fallible like the rest of us lesser mortals. The big difference between us and them is mostly that when they make mistakes, they can kill. That’s why I like doctors with open minds. Not so open that their brains fall out, as one wag put it; just enough to know orthodox medicine doesn’t have all the answers, and doctors would do a lot less harm if they prescribed real food instead of drugs. Here’s a look at doctors who say doctors should be a little more mindful about the medicine they practise. 

By Marika Sboros

Doctors have always had a name for it – iatrogenic disease – and for good reason. It comes …



MALHOTRA ON THE HEART OF GOOD MEDICINE

Dr Aseem Malhotra is a British consultant cardiologist and a key speaker at the first international low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) conference in Cape Town in February 2015. Malhotra is also that rare but growing breed: a cardiologist with an open mind and heart.

He is science director of Action on Sugar, a group of 23 specialists working to reduce sugar consumption in that country.

Here, in a Q&A on the conference, Malhotra tells me why he decided to attend. Malhotra also makes crystal clear his views on cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins and why fat phobia is not scientific.  

 By Marika Sboros

You once wanted to be a professional cricketer.  Cricketing’s loss is clearly cardiology’s gain.  Why didn’t you become a cricketer?

I’ve always had a passion for sport.  I played at a good level in cricket at school I used to open the batting for my



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